Categories

Arnold

The best movies on Netflix

We round up all of the best films you can watch right now on Netflix in the UK, from superhero staples to insightful indies.

Wondering what to watch next on Netflix? Here, we bring you a list of 30 brilliant movies available to stream on Netflix UK right now, ranging from action and adventure to thrillers and documentaries. There is so much choice on Netflix, but sometimes it can be too much choice and it’s really tricky to search through so we’ve sifted through the lot to come up with the ultimate list of movies that we think you’ll enjoy. (Our tips on how to navigate Netflix will help too[1]).

Here are the best films to watch on Netflix. This list was updated in January 2017, but movies are changing on Netflix every day. That might mean that one or two of these movies are no longer available to watch by the time you come to read this article, and some brilliant new movies may have emerged.

Let us know in the comments section below if your favourite movie is available on Netflix but not included here and we’ll endeavour to add it very soon. Let’s get down to business then. Here are the best movies to watch on Netflix in the UK right now.

You might also want to read: How to avoid the latest Netflix scam[2]. If you’re looking for TV shows to watch on Netflix UK, check out our best TV shows on Netflix[3] article.

Die Hard

Not only is Die Hard the best Christmas film of all time, it’s also one of the best action movies ever made. Bruce Willis’s John McClane is the epitome of the everyman action hero, Alan Rickman made his impeccable Hollywood debut as the villainous Hans Gruber, and that bit with the broken glass is just as good as you remember it.

Yippee ki-yay, etc. etc.

Django Unchained

Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Southern’ takes on slavery with the sort of black, anarchic tone that only he could get away with. Jamie Foxx is the titular former slave out for revenge, Christoph Waltz the gleeful bounty hunter at his side, and Leonardo DiCaprio gets a rare chance to show his sinister side as plantation owner Calvin Candie. Django Unchained doesn’t pull any punches, but then it wouldn’t be Tarantino if it did.

Airplane!

You haven’t seen Airplane!?

Surely you can’t be serious. This is quite possibly the silliest film ever made, assaulting the audience with a relentless bombardment of jokes, so densely packed that you’ll find something new to laugh at every time you watch it. It’s surreal, it’s stupid, and it’s absolutely the funniest film on Netflix right now.

The Warriors

If they were as colourful and exciting as they are in this ’70s cult classic, we’d all be a lot more accepting of criminal gangs.

After being framed for murder, the Warriors have to trek across New York to their Coney Island home, along the escaping the likes of the Baseball Furies, the Lizzies, and the Rogues. Any time someone sticks a load of empty beer bottles on their fingers and starts clinking them together, you have The Warriors to thank.

Labyrinth

In our new David Bowie-less world, we have to try and take comfort where we can. Namely in Labyrinth, which boasts his rightly legendary turn as the goblin king Jareth.

Look, it’s basically David Bowie with enormous hair surrounded by Jim Henson puppets and singing about babes for an hour and a half, and if that’s not enough to convince you then we just don’t know what is.

Dr. Strangelove

Stanley Kubrick’s only comedy still manages to be one of his most political films, its farcical take on the Cold War cutting uncomfortably close to the bone. Peter Sellers is brilliant in three (!) separate roles, the script is endlessly quotable, and it’s just about the only film out there that can leave you in fits of laughter over the nuclear apocalypse.

Under the Skin

Scarlett Johansson cruises round Glasgow in a white van picking up men to take home with her, but this is no Scottish sex fantasy – she’s an alien luring the men back to be… processed?

Killed? Consumed? It’s never made clear, but then not much else is in this enigmatic sci-fi masterpiece.

Don’t go in expecting a simple plot or exciting action, but if you want something unsettling, cryptic, and utterly beautiful, you can’t do much better than Under the Skin.

Anomalisa

Not many films climax with a five-minute sex scene between two stop motion-animated puppets, and even fewer could make that sex scene one of the most genuine and human in years, but then Anomalisa isn’t just any film. Charlie Kaufman’s latest may explore the mundanity of the ordinary, but it is anything but.

Guardians of the Galaxy

Marvel’s interstellar adventure is one of the company’s best films yet – and undoubtedly its funniest. Chris Pratt leads a ragtag group of space outlaws including a talking raccoon and a sentient tree as they begrudgingly end up saving the galaxy.

Worth it for the impeccable ’70s soundtrack alone.

The Lobster

This absurdist comedy imagines a world in which it’s illegal to be single, and those without a partner are given 45 days to find love – or be turned into an animal of their choice. The tone is unlike anything else out there, the dialogue is as weird as it is hilarious, and the cast is impeccable. You may not entirely understand everything about The Lobster, but you certainly won’t forget it.

Fargo

The Coen Brothers’ classic black comedy recently inspired an anthology TV show of the same name (also on Netflix, as it happens), and it remains one of their best.

The plot – a desperate car salesman hires two criminals to kidnap and ransom his own wife – is great, but it’s the none-more-quaint Minnesota setting that makes Fargo utterly unique.

Annie Hall

There are plenty of Woody Allen films on Netflix right now, but Annie Hall is almost certainly his best – and makes a brilliant introduction to his work if you’re new to it. It’s a wall-to-wall barrage of jokes, from high-brow philosophical references to low-brow slapstick and sex jokes, but behind it all there’s some genuine insight into modern relationships.

Dazed and Confused

Richard Linklater’s breakout hit perfectly captures the ’70s high school experience over the course of one woozy, beginning-of-the-summer day. It’s got all the drink, drugs, and underage sex you’d expect, but the real heart of the film is the exploration of the teenage mindset amid the turbulent ’70s.

Oh, and the ridiculously brilliant soundtrack doesn’t hurt either.

Predator

There have been a fair few Predator films now (with yet another on the way), but none have even come close to matching the original. Arnold Schwarzenegger proves once and for all that he’s the baddest dude not just on Earth, but on any planet, and teaches all of us a valuable lesson about getting to the chopper on the way.

From Dusk Till Dawn

Written by (and co-starring) Quentin Tarantino and directed by Robert Rodriguez, From Dusk Till Dawn was always going to be a bit nuts. There are vampire strippers, a penis pistol, and holy water guns, and that’s barely scratching the surface.

The only part we can’t quite get our heads around is buying that Tarantino and George Clooney are brothers.

Pumping Iron

Setting aside the excellent Making a Murderer series, Netflix generally punches below its weight when it comes to documentaries. It may not look like it, but Pumping Iron is a notable exception, following a pre-fame Arnold Schwarzenegger as he trains for the 1975 Mr. Olympia and Mr.

Universe bodybuilding competitions. It’s a great look into a weird sport, and an amazingly candid insight into the actor before he learnt to manage his public image.

Mission: Impossible

It’s now a franchise mostly associated with finding the tallest possible thing to hang Tom Cruise off (a cliff, the Burj Khalifa, a plane), but the first Mission: Impossible had more modest intentions. This reinvention of the ’60s spy show is filled with twists, turns, and dramatic reveals, bolstered by some surprisingly convincing spywork and that CIA break-in scene.

Cinema Paradiso

A true love letter to film itself, Cinema Paradiso is a touching reminder of just how deeply cinema can affect us all.

Framed as a flashback, the film follows a young film-obsessed boy in post-WWII Sicily, charting his youth and adolescence, ever accompanied by the flicker and whirr of the projector. It’s sweet, heartfelt, and absolutely beautiful.

Boyhood

You might worry that Boyhood only received the attention it did because of its striking gimmick: it was filmed over the course of 11 years, revisiting the actors at regular intervals in order to show them aging and growing in real-time. The good news is, behind all that Boyhood is also a truly excellent film, with all of director Richard Linklater’s gift for naturalistic dialogue, realistic characters, and thoughtful exploration of complex themes.

Brooklyn

If you ever find yourself in some sort of elaborate supervillain trap that you can only escape by crying on command, try watching Brooklyn.

You will weep. Buckets. Huge, horrible torrents of tears.

This story of a young Irish girl moving moving to New York in the ’30s is emotionally abusive from the get-go, and never really lets up. It’s brilliant, and you should definitely watch it, but don’t say we didn’t warn you.

Rear Window

There are a few Hitchcock classics on Netflix these days, but Rear Window is our recommendation for its combination of clever cinematography, white-knuckle plot, and the fact that there was a really great Simpsons parody of it that one time. James Stewart is great as the wheelchair-bound photographer who begins to suspect one of his neighbours is a murderer, but the real star is Hitchcock’s insight into the everyday lives of the residents.

Clueless

Teen comedies have a reputation for being, well, not very good.

There are a few exceptions (looking at you, Mean Girls), but Clueless is probably the best of the bunch. Alicia Silverstone is the ‘clueless’ teen obsessed with nothing more than popularity, clothes, and the state of her hair, who along the way makes new friends, learns life lessons, and falls in love with Paul Rudd. We’ve all been there.

A Single Man

People were understandably sceptical when fashion designer Tom Ford announced he was making a film, but A Single Man proved the sceptics wrong.

Helped by sterling performances from Colin Firth and Julianne Moore, this tale of a grieving gay man in ’60s California is as moving as it is stylish. And given it has Ford as a director, it’s very, very stylish indeed.

Beasts of No Nation

Netflix’s first original film may boast Idris Elba in its cast, but great as he is, he’s not the real star here. That honour belongs to Abraham Attah, the Ghanaian teenager who makes his acting debut here as a young boy dragged into service as a child soldier in a vicious civil war.

Unsurprisingly it’s pretty troubling stuff, but it’s undeniably powerful and difficult to forget.

Pan’s Labyrinth

This gothic fairytale comes from the warped (and genius) mind of Guillermo del Toro, following a young girl visited by a faun in Francoist Spain. This is no Disney film though, and she comes across some utterly terrifying monsters – and even worse humans. Creative creature design and a challenging story combine to create a modern classic.

The Shawshank Redemption

Regularly hailed as the best film of all time, Shawshank has become one of those films that you just have to see at some point in your life, even if you feel like you’ve already had most of the plot ruined by other people’s constant references to it.

It’s smart, it’s touching, and it has the archetypal wise-old-Morgan-Freeman character. What more could you want?

Love Is Strange

Love Is Strange is undeniably gentle, but don’t let that fool you into thinking it doesn’t pack a punch. The emotional impact of the film creeps up on you as it explores the relationship between two elderly gay men, temporarily forced to live apart, and there’s insight into love of all kinds: romantic, familial, and platonic.

Worth it for John Lithgow’s astonishing performance alone.

Under the Shadow

Set in Tehran during the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s, this Persian-language is that rarest of things: a horror movie that feels genuinely new. That’s in part thanks to the relatively novel monster (the shadowy Djinn), partly the setting, and partly the brilliant central performance from Narges Rashidi. It also manages the neat trick of being totally terrifying while shedding hardly a single drop of blood.

Sing Street

‘Charming’ doesn’t quite cover how delightful Sing Street is.

This musical jaunt is set in ’80s Dublin, following the endlessly earnest Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) as he sets up a school rock band with the purest of intentions: to win over a pretty girl. The group veers from genre to genre (and outfit to outfit), charting the shifting landscape of ’80s pop music, but every iteration is guaranteed to put a smile on your face.

Hunt for the Wilderpeople

If your only association with New Zealand and the cinema is The Lord of the Rings, you need to watch Hunt for the Wilderpeople. Taika Waititi’s weird coming-of-age film in the New Zealand bush (ahem) is as endearing as it is unique.

Julian Dennison is unforgettable as the foul-mouther wannabe rapper child who gets thrown into the foster care of Sam Neill’s outdoorsman, in the finest double act we can remember.

References

  1. ^ Our tips on how to navigate Netflix will help too (www.pcadvisor.co.uk)
  2. ^ How to avoid the latest Netflix scam (www.pcadvisor.co.uk)
  3. ^ Best TV shows on Netflix (www.pcadvisor.co.uk)

30 best movies on Netflix 2017: What to watch on Netflix UK

30 best movies on Netflix 2017: What to watch on Netflix UK

We round up all of the best films you can watch right now on Netflix in the UK, from superhero staples to insightful indies. Best movies on Netflix.

Wondering what to watch next on Netflix? Here, we bring you a list of 30 brilliant movies available to stream on Netflix UK right now, ranging from action and adventure to thrillers and documentaries.

There is so much choice on Netflix, but sometimes it can be too much choice and it’s really tricky to search through so we’ve sifted through the lot to come up with the ultimate list of movies that we think you’ll enjoy. (Our tips on how to navigate Netflix will help too[1]). Here are the best films to watch on Netflix. This list was updated in January 2017, but movies are changing on Netflix every day.

That might mean that one or two of these movies are no longer available to watch by the time you come to read this article, and some brilliant new movies may have emerged. Let us know in the comments section below if your favourite movie is available on Netflix but not included here and we’ll endeavour to add it very soon. Let’s get down to business then.

Here are the best movies to watch on Netflix in the UK right now. You might also want to read: How to avoid the latest Netflix scam[2]. If you’re looking for TV shows to watch on Netflix UK, check out our best TV shows on Netflix[3] article.

Die Hard

Not only is Die Hard the best Christmas film of all time, it’s also one of the best action movies ever made.

Bruce Willis’s John McClane is the epitome of the everyman action hero, Alan Rickman made his impeccable Hollywood debut as the villainous Hans Gruber, and that bit with the broken glass is just as good as you remember it. Yippee ki-yay, etc. etc.

Django Unchained

Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Southern’ takes on slavery with the sort of black, anarchic tone that only he could get away with. Jamie Foxx is the titular former slave out for revenge, Christoph Waltz the gleeful bounty hunter at his side, and Leonardo DiCaprio gets a rare chance to show his sinister side as plantation owner Calvin Candie.

Django Unchained doesn’t pull any punches, but then it wouldn’t be Tarantino if it did.

Airplane!

You haven’t seen Airplane!? Surely you can’t be serious. This is quite possibly the silliest film ever made, assaulting the audience with a relentless bombardment of jokes, so densely packed that you’ll find something new to laugh at every time you watch it.

It’s surreal, it’s stupid, and it’s absolutely the funniest film on Netflix right now.

The Warriors

If they were as colourful and exciting as they are in this ’70s cult classic, we’d all be a lot more accepting of criminal gangs. After being framed for murder, the Warriors have to trek across New York to their Coney Island home, along the escaping the likes of the Baseball Furies, the Lizzies, and the Rogues. Any time someone sticks a load of empty beer bottles on their fingers and starts clinking them together, you have The Warriors to thank.

Labyrinth

In our new David Bowie-less world, we have to try and take comfort where we can.

Namely in Labyrinth, which boasts his rightly legendary turn as the goblin king Jareth. Look, it’s basically David Bowie with enormous hair surrounded by Jim Henson puppets and singing about babes for an hour and a half, and if that’s not enough to convince you then we just don’t know what is.

Dr. Strangelove

Stanley Kubrick’s only comedy still manages to be one of his most political films, its farcical take on the Cold War cutting uncomfortably close to the bone.

Peter Sellers is brilliant in three (!) separate roles, the script is endlessly quotable, and it’s just about the only film out there that can leave you in fits of laughter over the nuclear apocalypse.

Under the Skin

Scarlett Johansson cruises round Glasgow in a white van picking up men to take home with her, but this is no Scottish sex fantasy – she’s an alien luring the men back to be… processed? Killed? Consumed?

It’s never made clear, but then not much else is in this enigmatic sci-fi masterpiece. Don’t go in expecting a simple plot or exciting action, but if you want something unsettling, cryptic, and utterly beautiful, you can’t do much better than Under the Skin.

Anomalisa

Not many films climax with a five-minute sex scene between two stop motion-animated puppets, and even fewer could make that sex scene one of the most genuine and human in years, but then Anomalisa isn’t just any film. Charlie Kaufman’s latest may explore the mundanity of the ordinary, but it is anything but.

Guardians of the Galaxy

Marvel’s interstellar adventure is one of the company’s best films yet – and undoubtedly its funniest.

Chris Pratt leads a ragtag group of space outlaws including a talking raccoon and a sentient tree as they begrudgingly end up saving the galaxy. Worth it for the impeccable ’70s soundtrack alone.

The Lobster

This absurdist comedy imagines a world in which it’s illegal to be single, and those without a partner are given 45 days to find love – or be turned into an animal of their choice. The tone is unlike anything else out there, the dialogue is as weird as it is hilarious, and the cast is impeccable.

You may not entirely understand everything about The Lobster, but you certainly won’t forget it.

Fargo

The Coen Brothers’ classic black comedy recently inspired an anthology TV show of the same name (also on Netflix, as it happens), and it remains one of their best. The plot – a desperate car salesman hires two criminals to kidnap and ransom his own wife – is great, but it’s the none-more-quaint Minnesota setting that makes Fargo utterly unique.

Annie Hall

There are plenty of Woody Allen films on Netflix right now, but Annie Hall is almost certainly his best – and makes a brilliant introduction to his work if you’re new to it. It’s a wall-to-wall barrage of jokes, from high-brow philosophical references to low-brow slapstick and sex jokes, but behind it all there’s some genuine insight into modern relationships.

Dazed and Confused

Richard Linklater’s breakout hit perfectly captures the ’70s high school experience over the course of one woozy, beginning-of-the-summer day.

It’s got all the drink, drugs, and underage sex you’d expect, but the real heart of the film is the exploration of the teenage mindset amid the turbulent ’70s. Oh, and the ridiculously brilliant soundtrack doesn’t hurt either.

Predator

There have been a fair few Predator films now (with yet another on the way), but none have even come close to matching the original. Arnold Schwarzenegger proves once and for all that he’s the baddest dude not just on Earth, but on any planet, and teaches all of us a valuable lesson about getting to the chopper on the way.

From Dusk Till Dawn

Written by (and co-starring) Quentin Tarantino and directed by Robert Rodriguez, From Dusk Till Dawn was always going to be a bit nuts.

There are vampire strippers, a penis pistol, and holy water guns, and that’s barely scratching the surface. The only part we can’t quite get our heads around is buying that Tarantino and George Clooney are brothers.

Pumping Iron

Setting aside the excellent Making a Murderer series, Netflix generally punches below its weight when it comes to documentaries. It may not look like it, but Pumping Iron is a notable exception, following a pre-fame Arnold Schwarzenegger as he trains for the 1975 Mr.

Olympia and Mr. Universe bodybuilding competitions. It’s a great look into a weird sport, and an amazingly candid insight into the actor before he learnt to manage his public image.

Mission: Impossible

It’s now a franchise mostly associated with finding the tallest possible thing to hang Tom Cruise off (a cliff, the Burj Khalifa, a plane), but the first Mission: Impossible had more modest intentions.

This reinvention of the ’60s spy show is filled with twists, turns, and dramatic reveals, bolstered by some surprisingly convincing spywork and that CIA break-in scene.

Cinema Paradiso

A true love letter to film itself, Cinema Paradiso is a touching reminder of just how deeply cinema can affect us all. Framed as a flashback, the film follows a young film-obsessed boy in post-WWII Sicily, charting his youth and adolescence, ever accompanied by the flicker and whirr of the projector. It’s sweet, heartfelt, and absolutely beautiful.

Boyhood

You might worry that Boyhood only received the attention it did because of its striking gimmick: it was filmed over the course of 11 years, revisiting the actors at regular intervals in order to show them aging and growing in real-time.

The good news is, behind all that Boyhood is also a truly excellent film, with all of director Richard Linklater’s gift for naturalistic dialogue, realistic characters, and thoughtful exploration of complex themes.

Brooklyn

If you ever find yourself in some sort of elaborate supervillain trap that you can only escape by crying on command, try watching Brooklyn. You will weep. Buckets.

Huge, horrible torrents of tears. This story of a young Irish girl moving moving to New York in the ’30s is emotionally abusive from the get-go, and never really lets up. It’s brilliant, and you should definitely watch it, but don’t say we didn’t warn you.

Rear Window

There are a few Hitchcock classics on Netflix these days, but Rear Window is our recommendation for its combination of clever cinematography, white-knuckle plot, and the fact that there was a really great Simpsons parody of it that one time.

James Stewart is great as the wheelchair-bound photographer who begins to suspect one of his neighbours is a murderer, but the real star is Hitchcock’s insight into the everyday lives of the residents.

Clueless

Teen comedies have a reputation for being, well, not very good. There are a few exceptions (looking at you, Mean Girls), but Clueless is probably the best of the bunch. Alicia Silverstone is the ‘clueless’ teen obsessed with nothing more than popularity, clothes, and the state of her hair, who along the way makes new friends, learns life lessons, and falls in love with Paul Rudd.

We’ve all been there.

A Single Man

People were understandably sceptical when fashion designer Tom Ford announced he was making a film, but A Single Man proved the sceptics wrong. Helped by sterling performances from Colin Firth and Julianne Moore, this tale of a grieving gay man in ’60s California is as moving as it is stylish. And given it has Ford as a director, it’s very, very stylish indeed.

Beasts of No Nation

Netflix’s first original film may boast Idris Elba in its cast, but great as he is, he’s not the real star here.

That honour belongs to Abraham Attah, the Ghanaian teenager who makes his acting debut here as a young boy dragged into service as a child soldier in a vicious civil war. Unsurprisingly it’s pretty troubling stuff, but it’s undeniably powerful and difficult to forget.

Pan’s Labyrinth

This gothic fairytale comes from the warped (and genius) mind of Guillermo del Toro, following a young girl visited by a faun in Francoist Spain. This is no Disney film though, and she comes across some utterly terrifying monsters – and even worse humans.

Creative creature design and a challenging story combine to create a modern classic.

The Shawshank Redemption

Regularly hailed as the best film of all time, Shawshank has become one of those films that you just have to see at some point in your life, even if you feel like you’ve already had most of the plot ruined by other people’s constant references to it. It’s smart, it’s touching, and it has the archetypal wise-old-Morgan-Freeman character. What more could you want?

Love Is Strange

Love Is Strange is undeniably gentle, but don’t let that fool you into thinking it doesn’t pack a punch.

The emotional impact of the film creeps up on you as it explores the relationship between two elderly gay men, temporarily forced to live apart, and there’s insight into love of all kinds: romantic, familial, and platonic. Worth it for John Lithgow’s astonishing performance alone.

Under the Shadow

Set in Tehran during the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s, this Persian-language is that rarest of things: a horror movie that feels genuinely new. That’s in part thanks to the relatively novel monster (the shadowy Djinn), partly the setting, and partly the brilliant central performance from Narges Rashidi.

It also manages the neat trick of being totally terrifying while shedding hardly a single drop of blood.

Sing Street

‘Charming’ doesn’t quite cover how delightful Sing Street is. This musical jaunt is set in ’80s Dublin, following the endlessly earnest Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) as he sets up a school rock band with the purest of intentions: to win over a pretty girl. The group veers from genre to genre (and outfit to outfit), charting the shifting landscape of ’80s pop music, but every iteration is guaranteed to put a smile on your face.

Hunt for the Wilderpeople

If your only association with New Zealand and the cinema is The Lord of the Rings, you need to watch Hunt for the Wilderpeople.

Taika Waititi’s weird coming-of-age film in the New Zealand bush (ahem) is as endearing as it is unique.

Julian Dennison is unforgettable as the foul-mouther wannabe rapper child who gets thrown into the foster care of Sam Neill’s outdoorsman, in the finest double act we can remember.

References

  1. ^ Our tips on how to navigate Netflix will help too (www.pcadvisor.co.uk)
  2. ^ How to avoid the latest Netflix scam (www.pcadvisor.co.uk)
  3. ^ Best TV shows on Netflix (www.pcadvisor.co.uk)

How to survive the coming AI revolution

If the popular media are to be believed, artificial intelligence (AI) is coming to steal your job and threaten life as we know it. If we do not prepare now, we may face a future where AI runs free and dominates humans in society. The Conversation[1][2][3][4][5] The AI revolution[6] is indeed underway.

To ensure you are prepared to make it through the times ahead, we’ve created a handy survival guide for you.

Step 1: Recognising AI

The first step in every conflict is knowing your target. It is crucial to acknowledge that AI is not in the future; it is already here. You are most likely using it on a daily basis.

AI is the magic glue behind the ranking of your Facebook timeline[7], how Netflix knows what to suggest you watch next[8], and how Google predicts where you are headed[9] when you jump in your car. AI is not a new concept. It was born in the summer of 1956[10], when a group of pioneers came together with a dream to build machines as intelligent as humans.

AI encompasses disciplines such as machine learning, which can find patterns in data[11] and learn to predict phenomena, as well as computer vision, speech processing and robotics. The main technique behind the current hype around deep learning[12] is artificial neural networks[13]. Inspired by models of the brain, these mathematical systems work by mapping inputs to a set of outputs based on features of the thing being examined.

In computer vision, for example, a feature is a pattern of pixels that provides information about an object. Cat Most commonly, the supervised learning approach requires the computer to “learn” these associations by training on big data sets labelled by humans.

What began with classifying cat videos[14] has now extended to applications such as driving autonomous vehicles[15].

Step 2: Identify where AI thrives

With this knowledge, we can start to understand where AI is optimally positioned to take over. Have a look around you and take note of tasks that require huge amounts of data processing. For example, no human would or could look through everyone’s click patterns on Google to figure out what someone wants.

Even the more advanced capabilities that AI has demonstrated in winning AlphaGo[16], video games[17] and, most recently, poker[18] rely on training on thousands and thousands of trials. Essentially, AI is particularly good at any task that requires an enormous amount of repetitive processing. If this sounds like your job, it might be time to start thinking of a survival plan.

To evaluate your “automation risk”, type in your job on this site[19] to find out what researchers have calculated for your field. Even if you’re not worried, have a look. The prepared person stays ahead.

[embedded content]

Step 3: Devise an action plan

You now have two choices:

Option A: Resistance

Your first option is to fight back. This may be your natural reaction and, as in during the industrial revolution, you would not be alone in wanting to oppose the change[20]. The fact that common AI relies on pattern recognition means that you can sabotage the way it processes data[21] quite easily.

But pose too much of a threat and Arnold Schwarzenegger may go back to try and kill you as an infant[22]. The nature of the human race is that we will always strive towards the next advancement. Resisting change out of fear of its disadvantages may work in the short term but will only make you more likely to be left behind in the future.

Option B: Make friends with AI

The far superior strategy is to form a treaty.

Accept that AI will increasingly become a part of society and look for possibilities to collaborate. There is a huge potential for AI to assist in places where humans fall short, precisely because of the processing power. Companies are already using AI to aid clinicians in medical diagnosis[23], personalise customer experiences[24] and create agricultural methods[25] that reduce the cost to the environment.

Some are even developing this relationship one step further with integrated systems that merge the human brain with AI[26]. Be ready to upskill where possible. AI can learn very well but it cannot learn flexibly (yet).

You can. There are new jobs[27] now available that did not exist five years ago. If you allow AI to do the grit work, this can create opportunity to embrace the attributes that humans excel at, namely creativity, social intelligence and manipulation[28].

As with every big change, there are fears about new technology like AI. Ultimately, the way to survive the AI revolution is to embrace the partnership. Understand the potential that AI has to improve the world around you and look for those opportunities to implement positive change.

If you prepare yourself, you may find the AI revolution allows you not only to survive but to be an even better version of your human self. Natalie Rens, PhD Candidate in Cognitive Neuroscience, The University of Queensland[30] and Juxi Leitner, Research Fellow, Robotics & AI, Queensland University of Technology[32][29][31] This article was originally published on The Conversation[33].

Read the original article[34].

Now read: NASA releases a ton of free space and science software[35]

References

  1. ^ artificial intelligence (www.economist.com)
  2. ^ steal your job (www.afr.com)
  3. ^ threaten life as we know it (www.nickbostrom.com)
  4. ^ prepare now (www.telegraph.co.uk)
  5. ^ dominates humans in society (observer.com)
  6. ^ AI revolution (theconversation.com)
  7. ^ ranking of your Facebook timeline (code.facebook.com)
  8. ^ suggest you watch next (www.theverge.com)
  9. ^ Google predicts where you are headed (www.gizmodo.com.au)
  10. ^ summer of 1956 (en.wikipedia.org)
  11. ^ find patterns in data (theconversation.com)
  12. ^ deep learning (theconversation.com)
  13. ^ artificial neural networks (en.wikipedia.org)
  14. ^ cat videos (www.nytimes.com)
  15. ^ driving autonomous vehicles (fortune.com)
  16. ^ AlphaGo (theconversation.com)
  17. ^ video games (theconversation.com)
  18. ^ poker (theconversation.com)
  19. ^ on this site (www.bbc.com)
  20. ^ oppose the change (industrialrevolution.org.uk)
  21. ^ sabotage the way it processes data (www.evolvingai.org)
  22. ^ kill you as an infant (www.imdb.com)
  23. ^ medical diagnosis (www.maxwellmri.com)
  24. ^ personalise customer experiences (www.commbank.com.au)
  25. ^ agricultural methods (www.qut.edu.au)
  26. ^ human brain with AI (medium.com)
  27. ^ new jobs (www.lifehacker.com.au)
  28. ^ creativity, social intelligence and manipulation (futureoflife.org)
  29. ^ Natalie Rens (theconversation.com)
  30. ^ The University of Queensland (theconversation.com)
  31. ^ Juxi Leitner (theconversation.com)
  32. ^ Queensland University of Technology (theconversation.com)
  33. ^ The Conversation (theconversation.com)
  34. ^ original article (theconversation.com)
  35. ^ NASA releases a ton of free space and science software (mybroadband.co.za)