Categories

No full broadband service until 2023

No full broadband service until 2023 Thomas McEvoy

  • No full broadband service until 2023 Independent.ie People living in rural parts of Louth could face a five year delay for full access to broadband services, Louth County Councillors heard last week. https://www.independent.ie/regionals/argus/news/no-full-broadband-service-until-2023-36514172.html

    https://www.independent.ie/regionals/argus/news/article36514171.ece/ad1ef/AUTOCROP/h342/2018-01-23_the_37841446_I1.JPG

  • Email[1]

People living in rural parts of Louth could face a five year delay for full access to broadband services, Louth County Councillors heard last week. Thomas McEvoy, Head of Enterprise at the Louth Local Enterprise Office (LEO) gave an update to the council on the progress being made in broadband roll out across the county. He said that Louth was ‘ahead of the curve’, and was the first county in Ireland to publish its strategy in response to the National Broadband Plan.

‘By June 2018, a minimum 86% of County Louth premises, potentially 89% will have access to high speed broadband. ‘Outside of Dublin this is the highest level of broadband penetration of all counties in Ireland.’ He explained that as of November 2017 over 49,000 out of 60,000 premises in Louth had access to high speed broadband.

An additional 2,541 premises will have access by June this year. He added that the timeline for full broadband access across Louth had stretched to 2023, which was ‘not ideal’ for the 14% of people currently without it. ‘But it does mean that there is a plan, said Mr.McEvoy.’

He said that an interactive map which can provide ‘street and premises level detail’ on broadband coverage was available through the website www.dccae.gov.ie Three providers were currently extending their fibre optic network service in Louth, OpenEir, Virgin Media and E-Net. Cllr.

Mark Dearey noted that Louth was ahead of other counties, but added that the 14% of people who do not have access ‘will obviously not be happy about the delay.’ ‘But there is a clear timeline for when this will happen.’ Cllr.

Emma Coffey highlighted the ‘great disparity’ between urban and rural access, which she said would ‘impact on pressurised urban areas.’ The LEO spokesman admitted that there would not be full access across the country until 2023. Cllr.

Oliver Tully added that people who do not have broadband feel ‘very much disenfranchised’ and he was sorry to hear it would take until 2023 for full service. Cllr. Antoin Watters asked if there might be a focus on particular areas.

He highlighted the post office in Jenkinstown and areas of Omeath which were in need of broadband service. Mr. McEvoy encouraged people to check the interactive map for areas that are being added to the network.

‘We do encourage people to check the map as OpenEir in particular are telling us it is ahead of schedule.

‘It will indicate right down to street level and premises level the up to date connections made.’

He added that the 86% highlighted may well have already extended to 89% when current connections are taken into account.

The Argus

References

  1. ^ Email (www.independent.ie)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *