11-23-11-30

Solomon's words for the wise: PFBC Unveils Keystone Select …

PFBC Unveils Keystone Select Stocked Trout Waters ERIE, Pa. (Sept.

29) Trout anglers who want an experience targeting bigger fish will have the opportunity to catch 14 -20 trout in eight Keystone Select Stocked Trout Waters, unveiled here today at the quarterly meeting of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC). Under the program, approximately 3,200 large trout will be distributed among the eight waters, one in each commissioner district. The trout will be stocked at a rate of up to 250 trout per mile, which is comparable to the numbers of fish of this size in Pennsylvania s best wild trout waters. The eight waters include:

  • Chester County, Middle Branch White Clay Creek, Section 3 (1.67 miles)
  • Dauphin County, Wiconisco Creek, Section 3 (0.74 miles)
  • Lackawanna/Wyoming Counties, South Branch Tunkhannock Creek, Section 4 (0.99 miles)
  • Lawrence County, Neshannock Creek, Section 3 (2.67 miles)
  • Lycoming County, Loyalsock Creek, Section 5 (1.49 miles)
  • Potter County, First Fork Sinnemahoning Creek, Section 4 (1.67 miles)
  • Somerset County, Laurel Hill Creek, Section 3 (2.33 miles)
  • Westmoreland County, Loyalhanna Creek, Section 3 (1.67 miles)

We wanted to add an element of excitement to trout fishing and at the same time remind anglers that the trout season can extend well into the summer, said PFBC Executive Director John Arway. These are the biggest stocked trout we raise, so anglers will definitely enjoy catching them.

And the waters are regulated under Delayed Harvest Artificial Lures Only (DHALO) regulations, which provides the opportunity to catch these fish multiple times. Under DHALO regulations, waters are open to fishing year-round. But anglers may harvest trout only between June 15 and Labor Day and the trout have to be a minimum of nine inches. From the day after Labor Day until June 15, these waters are managed on a catch-and-release-only basis and the creel limit is zero. Tackle is limited to artificial lures and flies. Arway added that similar programs have proven very popular on other waters, such as Pine Creek in Lycoming County.
These programs have successfully demonstrated that destination fisheries can be created, drawing anglers from across the state and even the country and providing an economic boost to local communities, he said. We re confident our program will have the same effect and we ll draw anglers to each of these eight destinations.
The waters in Dauphin and Chester counties will be stocked with the larger trout in advance of the regional opening day of trout season on April 2. The other waters will be stocked prior to the April 16 statewide opener for trout. Each of the eight waters will also receive an in-season stocking in late April. Both stockings will include a number of these larger fish. The PFBC website or FishBoatPA app should be consulted for the actual stocking dates.
PFBC staff presented the concept of the new program at the last quarterly meeting, and then ran an online promotion asking anglers to submit suggestions for the name.

More than 1,550 submissions were received with 144 different names recommended by the public. A committee reviewed the selections and the Keystone Select Stocked Trout Waters name was chosen, said Leroy Young, Director of the Bureau of Fisheries. This name ties the program uniquely to Pennsylvania and includes the new Stocked Trout Waters name, which replaces the previously named Approved Trout Waters beginning in 2016.
In other Commission action today, the Board:

  • Approved the acquisition of an easement on 1,600 linear feet along Conneaut Creek as it flows across property owned by the Borough of Conneautville, Crawford County, for $25,000. The easement will be for public fishing, boating and riparian and fishery management. The PFBC will also acquire easements for parking and a footpath to provide access to the creek. The easement area is located north of Route 198. Conneaut Creek provides significant steelhead fishing opportunities in the area.
  • Approved the sale of 53 acres of the PFBC s Hereford Manor property in Franklin Township, Beaver County. The property is not actively used by the PFBC. It sits southwest of State Route 288 and south of Lake Road and is separated by the roads from the remaining 396.5 acres that comprise Hereford Manor. Abarta Oil & Gas Company, Inc.

    has agreed to purchase 16 acres for $200,000. The Zelienople Municipal Airport has agreed to purchase 37 acres for approximately $148,000. The PFBC will retain all oil, gas, coal, mineral and timber rights on the property.

  • Approved an amendment to boating regulations which eliminates the restriction for personal watercraft (PWC) to tow no more than one skier. The total number of persons being towed, in addition to the operator, observer and any other passengers, may not exceed the maximum passenger capacity of the boat. The amendment goes into effect on Jan.

    1, 2016.

  • In Beaver County, approved a regulatory amendment which limit boats on the lower section of Little Beaver Creek to slow, no wake speed from the PA/OH state line to the creek s mouth on the Ohio River. This section of the creek flows through the borough of Ohioville and is used mostly for fishing, paddling and accessing the Ohio River by the borough s access area. The amendment goes into effect on Jan.

    1, 2016.

  • In Beaver County, approved a regulatory amendment which prohibits the use of boats powered by internal combustion engines on Bradys Run Lake in order to conform to county regulations. The 28-acre lake is owned and operated by the Beaver County Recreation and Tourism Department. The amendment goes into effect on Jan.

    1, 2016.

  • In Bucks County, approved a regulatory amendment which limits boats on Neshaminy Creek to slow, no wake speed on the entire creek from its headwaters to its confluence with the Delaware River. The amendment goes into effect on Jan.

    1, 2016.

  • In Cumberland County, approved a regulatory amendment which eliminates the waterskiing zone on the Conodoguinet Creek in the vicinity of the Power Company Dam at Cave Hill. This does not prohibit water skiing.

    Boaters may still waterski as long as conditions allow for safe operations. The amendment goes into effect on Jan.

    1, 2016.

  • In Delaware County, approved a regulatory amendment which limits boats on Darby Creek to slow, no wake speed on the entire creek from its headwaters to its confluence with the Delaware River. The amendment goes into effect on Jan.

    1, 2016.

  • In Lehigh County, approved a regulatory amendment which allows water skiing on the Lehigh River at the Allentown Pool, between the Tilghman Street Bridge and the Hamilton Street Dam in Allentown. The amendment goes into effect on Jan.

    1, 2016.

  • In Luzerne County, approved the publication of a notice of proposed rulemaking which would allow boats up to and including 20 feet in length to operate on Lily Lake. Currently, only boats 18 feet and shorter are permitted. If approved on final rulemaking, the amendment would go into effect when published in the PA Bulletin.
  • Approved the publication of a notice of proposed rulemaking which would eliminate the requirement that inflatable boats must have at least two separate buoyancy chambers in order to be used on PFBC lakes. With the advent of high-quality, durable inflatable boats with less than two separate buoyancy chambers, such as inflatable standup paddleboards, the PFBC believes the current regulation is overly restrictive.
  • Approved the designation of five lakes as catch and release lakes in order to restore the fisheries. Each of the lakes were lowered or drained in recent years to repair or rebuild dams. They include Colyer Lake, Potter Township, Centre County; Speedwell Forge Lake, Elizabeth Township, Lancaster County; Lake Jean, Ricketts Glen State Park, Luzerne and Sullivan counties; Lower Owl Creek, Tamaqua, Schuylkill County; and Lake Nessmuk, Wellsboro, Tioga County. The PFBC will monitor fish populations at the lakes while they develop and recommend appropriate regulations once the fisheries are rebuilt in order to continually provide high quality recreational angling opportunities.
  • Approved the publication of a notice of proposed rulemaking to add the Hornyhead Chub to the state s Endangered Species list; to remove the Mountain Brook Lamprey from the Threatened Species list; and remove the Hornyhead Chub, Ohio Lamprey, Bowfin and Timber Rattlesnake from the Candidate Species list.
  • Added 102 waters to the list of wild trout streams, revised the section limits of four waters, and removed one water. The list can be found on the PFBC website.1
  • Added 40 stream sections to the list of Class A wild trout streams.

    The list can be found on the PFBC website.2

  • Approved a pass-through grant of up to $130,000 to the Eastern Pennsylvania Coalition for Abandoned Mine Reclamation or other appropriate partner organization for the removal of the Solomon Creek Dam in Luzerne County. The PFBC received the funds from the state Department of Transportation as mitigation for a highway improvement project on State Route 3046, Section 301, known as the South Valley Parkway Project.
  • Adopted the 2015 Pennsylvania Wildlife Action Plan. As required by Congress, State Wildlife Action Plans must be revised no less than every 10 years.

    The plan and associated funding from State and Tribal Wildlife Grants have been crucial for protecting and recovering imperiled species and their habitats.

References

  1. ^ website (m1e.net)
  2. ^ website (m1e.net)

Solomon's words for the wise: Flash Flood Watch

The National Weather Service has issued a Flash Flood Watch. …WIDESPREAD HEAVY RAIN EXPECTED THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH WEDNESDAY
MORNING…
.A SLOW MOVING COLD FRONTAL BOUNDARY…POTENT UPPER LEVEL
DISTURBANCE…AND EXTENSIVE PLUME OF DEEP TROPICAL MOISTURE WILL
COMBINE TO BRING MUCH OF CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA HEAVY RAINFALL OF 2
TO 3.5 INCHES OF RAIN OVER THE UPCOMING 36 HOURS. NARROW BANDS OF
MUCH HIGHER AMOUNTS OF 4 TO 5 INCHES ARE POSSIBLE.

THESE HIGHER
AMOUNTS COULD LEAD TO FLOODING OF SMALL STREAMS AND CREEKS WITH
EVENTUAL SIGNIFICANT RISES ON AREA RIVERS DURING THE SECOND HALF
OF THE WEEK.
…FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FROM 4 PM EDT THIS AFTERNOON
THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING…
THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN STATE COLLEGE HAS ISSUED A
* FLASH FLOOD WATCH FOR A PORTION OF CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA…
INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING BEDFORD…BLAIR…CAMBRIA…CAMERON…
CLEARFIELD…CUMBERLAND…ELK…FRANKLIN…FULTON…
HUNTINGDON…JUNIATA…MIFFLIN…NORTHERN CENTRE…NORTHERN …
CLINTON…NORTHERN LYCOMING…PERRY…POTTER…SNYDER…
SOMERSET…SOUTHERN CENTRE…SOUTHERN CLINTON…SOUTHERN
LYCOMING…SULLIVAN…TIOGA AND UNION.
* FROM 4 PM EDT THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING
* WIDESPREAD HEAVY RAIN OF 2 TO 3.5 INCHES WILL OCCUR THIS
AFTERNOON THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING…WITH LOCALIZED BANDS OF 4 TO
5 INCHES POSSIBLE.
* THE HEAVIEST RAIN AND MOST RAPID RISES ON AREA STREAMS AND
CREEKS WILL BE MOST LIKELY AROUND…OR AFTER DUSK TONIGHT.
FLOODING AT NIGHT IS ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS…SINCE HEAVY RAIN
AND POOR VISIBILITY COULD MAKE IT DIFFICULT TO SEE AREAS OF
FLOODING…DEBRIS ON THE ROADS…OR EVEN WASHED OUT ROADWAYS. For more information:
http://radar.weather.gov/radar.php?rid=CCX&product=N0R&overlay=11101111&loop=yes1 http://alert.selfip.net2

You received this message because you registered on AlertPA. To change your alerting preferences go to https://alert.pa.gov/mygroups.php3 Tell a friend/co-worker about AlertPA!

Forward this message to them and have them register for this free service at https://alert.pa.gov/4

References

  1. ^ http://radar.weather.gov/radar.php?rid=CCX&product=N0R&overlay=11101111&loop=yes (radar.weather.gov)
  2. ^ http://alert.selfip.net (alert.selfip.net)
  3. ^ https://alert.pa.gov/mygroups.php (alert.pa.gov)
  4. ^ https://alert.pa.gov/ (alert.pa.gov)

Solomon's words for the wise: Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commission

S.O.S. Save Our Susquehanna! Campaign Tops $20,000


The PFBC s campaign to save the Susquehanna River has topped $20,000 in donations, including a $1,000 contribution from the Cumberland County Enola Sportsmen s Association and $13,000 in proceeds from the sale of S.O.S.

buttons. The PFBC launched the campaign on June 2 by announcing that a portion of license sales and proceeds from a $10 S.O.S. button would be dedicated to funding water and soil conservation projects along the Susquehanna River, whose young smallmouth bass population has been plagued over the last decade by illness and elevated mortality rates. To kick off the campaign, PFBC Executive Director John Arway pledged $50,000 in matching funds. Click here to learn more about the S.O.S. Save Our Susquehanna! Campaign or to donate.1 WCO Cadets Continue Training


The 20 cadets making up the 21st Waterways Conservation Officers (WCO) class are continuing with their ACT 120 training at the Pennsylvania State Police Northwest Training Center in Meadville, Crawford County. The class is due to complete this stage of training on Dec.

4. The training course covers all phases of police work, from the Vehicle and Crimes codes to use of firearms and conducting criminal investigations. Officers will then complete six months of classroom studies and in-the-field training at the PFBC’s H.R. Stackhouse School in Bellefonte, which includes assisting with investigations, patrolling regions, participating in public outreach events and stocking waterways. PHOTO – WCO candidates practice self-defense skills. Cumberland County Big Spring Creek Survey Finds More Brook Trout


Fisheries staff conducted a follow-up survey of Cumberland County s Big Spring Creek, Sections 01 and 02, on Aug.

24 to evaluate the response of the fishery to large scale habitat enhancement projects constructed during 2010 and 2013. Reach-wide, preliminary results indicate continued increased abundance of Brook Trout, while Rainbow Trout abundance remained steady or continued to decline following an initial proliferation of that species in 2011. Two years following the completion of the 2013 project, Brook Trout now account for greater than 50 percent of the total number of trout estimated to reside in the portion of Big Spring Creek managed with Catch-and-Release Fly-Fishing Only angling regulations. Click here for more information about the Big Spring Creek management plan.2 PHOTO – A Brook Trout from Big Spring Creek. Habitat Work Underway at Lakes in Lancaster and Butler Counties


The restoration of two lakes formerly classified as high-hazard and unsafe continues with PFBC staff recently building and installing habitat structures in Lancaster County s Speedwell Forge Lake and Butler County s Glade Run Lake. At Speedwell, staff worked with the Lancaster County Bassmasters and the Save Speedwell group to place 245 rock and wood habitat structures. More than $20,000 was raised by the partner organizations for materials and machine rental for the project. In Butler County, staff is working with the Glade Run Lake Conservancy to place 250 rock and wood habitat structures in the lake. The conservancy received a $20,000 grant from the Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership for the project. Speedwell Forge and Glade Run were completely drained in 2011 when dams on the lakes were declared unsafe.

Both are in the process of being rebuilt. Speedwell is expected to be completed in early 2016, and Glade Run in late 2016. For more information about the High-Hazard, Unsafe Dam Revitalization Program click here.3 PHOTO – A spider hump is one of the structures placed at Speedwell Forge Lake. State Threatened Species List


With the July 18 publication of a final rulemaking order in the PA Bulletin, the Bluebreast Darter, Tippecanoe Darter, Gilt Darter, and Spotted Darter have been officially removed from the state s list of threatened species. The PFBC first proposed removing the darters at the Sept.

2014 quarterly business meeting. Click here for more information about the darters.4 PHOTO – Bluebreast darter. Wildlife Action Plan Nears Completion


State wildlife action plans are designed to help keep our common native species from becoming more rare, said PFBC Executive Director John Arway. For rare species already listed as threatened or endangered, the plan is a framework to assist with their recovery. This is an important opportunity to demonstrate how we can work together to protect, conserve and enhance not only our diverse fish and wildlife resources but also the habitats that allow them to continue to live and survive on our Commonwealth s lands and in our waters. A completed plan is expected to be submitted to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service by Sept.

30, 2015. Click here to view the draft plan.5 Catfish Survey on North Branch Susquehanna Produces High Catch


During the summer of 2014, PFBC biologists undertook a first-ever census of Catfish populations in the North Branch Susquehanna River.

Hoop nets were set at 32 locations in the river starting at Northumberland and continuing upriver to Whites Ferry, a distance of 87 river miles. Each hoop net was baited with a mixture of cheese, soybeans and molasses, and was allowed to fish for three days. The 32 hoop nets captured an incredible 4,488 Channel Catfish for a catch rate of 152 per net, which was very high. The Channel Catfish ranged from 13 to 33 inches long with the majority (52%) exceeding 20 inches (Figure 1). The heaviest weighed 14.59 pounds and these fish ranged from 2 to 17 years old. The 32 hoop nets also caught 19 Flathead Catfish, which are an invasive species in the Susquehanna River basin. They are well established in the main stem of the Susquehanna River but this was the first time they have been documented in the North Branch. Flathead Catfish were found as far upriver as Kingston (river mile 62.77). All of the Flatheads in the North Branch were young fish, ranging from 19 to 24 inches in length and 2 to 5 years in age. To read the biologist report, click here.6 Biologists plan to continue the North Branch Susquehanna River Catfish survey in coming years. Future work will look at Catfish populations from Whites Ferry to the Pennsylvania/New York Border.

Additionally, future studies will determine the impact of Flathead Catfish invasion on the dense Channel Catfish population of the North Branch. Figure 1. Length-frequency distribution of Channel Catfish captured in the North Branch Susquehanna River during 2014. Public Comments to be Sought on Draft Revision to State Trout Plan


A draft revision of the state trout plan has been prepared by the Trout Work Group and will soon be released on the PFBC website for public comment. The Trout Work Group is comprised of representatives of various sportsmen s groups as well as unaffiliated anglers interested in trout fishing.

To view the current trout plan, click here.7 Additional Waters Proposed for Addition to State Wild Trout List


Based on results from the Unassessed Waters Initiative, 102 waters will be proposed for addition to the wild trout list, and 40 stream sections will be proposed for the Class A wild trout streams list at the Sept.

28-29 Commission meeting in Erie.8

References

  1. ^ here (m1e.net)
  2. ^ here (m1e.net)
  3. ^ here (m1e.net)
  4. ^ here (m1e.net)
  5. ^ here (m1e.net)
  6. ^ here (m1e.net)
  7. ^ here (m1e.net)
  8. ^ Initiative (m1e.net)