Lothian

Reference Library – Scotland – Lothian Broadband

Can I give up my landline and use 4G broadband?

‘I am wondering about signing up for Three’s 40GB HomeFi. It has to cover our home internet needs – two computers, two mobile phones … Would this be feasible?’ Photograph: Maskot/Getty Images/Maskot

When we went travelling, we gave up our Virgin contract for an internet and TV package. We have been using Three’s “Feel at home” for mobile phone internet access on data roaming quite successfully. Now, going home, I am wondering about signing up for Three’s 40GB HomeFi. It has to cover our home internet needs – two computers, two mobile phones – in central Edinburgh. I’m not bothered about internet TV because we can get a new DVD player/Freeview HD recorder. Would this be feasible? Paul123

The general answer is no. Today, most people are better off paying for a wired internet connection.

The specific answer is: it depends.

Millions of people have replaced wired with mobile broadband for a variety of reasons. These include the (low) quality of the wired broadband available, their online needs, and their personal situation – like you, they might be travelling, either for business or pleasure. Consider a family with two teenagers who watch lots of movies on Netflix, stream music on Spotify and play online games. They will probably use well over 100GB a month, and would benefit from having the fastest unlimited broadband they can get. By contrast, singletons who only use broadband for email and social networking can probably manage with a 4G service, though it may not save them any money.

Of course, the final decision will depend on what’s available. Type your post code or phone number into the UK Broadband Availability Checker4 at Sam Knows to find out which companies offer broadband services in your area. Click the Wireless button for wireless services such as Blaze, Lothian Broadband and Urban Wimax. There are dozens of these FWA (Fixed Wireless Access) systems in the UK, using wireless systems such as Wimax5, which are not 3G/4G networks. Check reviews at ISP Review6 and similar websites before you sign up. Sam doesn’t know about 3G/4G services, but you can check those with Ofcom’s free broadband and mobile checker app7 for Android and Apple’s iOS.

If you live in central Edinburgh, you should have plenty of options. Virgin does not appear to offer cable in the city centre, but Virgin, BT and CityFibre (sold to business users by Commsworld8) all have fibre networks.

Cellular broadband

The 3G networks launched in the UK in 20039 were too slow to replace wired broadband. However, in 2012, we got the first 4G networks10, offering speeds of 8-12Mbps, and current versions generally offer 18-24Mbps. In theory these are fast enough. The main drawbacks are the availability of 4G services, the variability of download speeds, and the high prices. Cellular networks are expensive to build and run, and being designed originally for voice calls, they have limited bandwidth.

This is reflected in the high prices they now charge for data, and the even higher prices they charge once you go over your data cap. If you sign up for Three’s HomeFi11, you get 40GB for ?24 per month, which is a fairly reasonable ?1.67 per gigabyte. However, once you have used your allowance, you have to buy an add-on12. These appear to cost either ?10 for 1GB, or ?15 for 3GB. Cellular networks also prioritise voice calls, which means they may limit “tethering” (using a mobile phone to connect a PC to the internet) or block it altogether.

Either way, “contention” – too many users competing for a limited resource – is more of a problem with cellular than with landline networks. One operator, Giffgaff, explains why it uses Traffic Flow13 to maintain services. It says that “as few as 1% of members were using around 30% of the total network resource. This unfair distribution causes an inconsistent experience for the majority of members”. In fact, “there are examples of members using double the average monthly network resource within a single day, during peak hours.” As a result, it now limits people who use its Always On service to 6GB of data at full speed, after which it caps the speed at 384kbps between 8am and midnight.

Contention problems are more likely in big cities, but your 4G performance may be perfectly acceptable in the evenings when fewer people are making phone calls. You may be able to find test results for your local area at Broadbandspeedchecker.co.uk14 or uSwitch15 etc, though most of the tests are of wired not wireless broadband.

According to Netflix16, a standard definition movies consume about 0.7GB per hour, high-definition movies about 3GB per hour, and Ultra HD movies 7GB per hour. You won’t want to do much of that if you are paying Three ?1.67 per gigabyte, let alone ?5 or ?10 per gigabyte. Photograph: Ryan Anson/AFP/Getty Images

5G cometh

The next generation of mobile broadband is already being tested in the UK17, and 5G FWA18 broadband should be a viable substitute for landlines, depending on how it is priced. It might be available in 2020. Arqiva has negotiated the rights to install small cells on tens of thousands of lampposts in a dozen London boroughs, and a few cities including Manchester, Southampton and Colchester.

Also, Ofcom is about to auction 190MHz of spectrum for 5G19 in the 2.3GHz and 3.4GHz bands. These are similar to the 2.4GHz and 5GHz used for wifi. It’s not clear how much speed 5G will actually deliver, but more than 100Mbps should be practicable, given that 1Gbps is theoretically possible. However, like fibre and cable broadband, I expect 5G FWA will mainly be available in town centres and rich suburbs.

DIY options

Three’s HomeFi system includes a Huawei B310 router, which costs ?59.99 but is free if you sign a 12-month contract. Alternatively, you could buy your own 4G router and shop around for cheap sim-only data deals. Huawei E5577C (?69.99)?232.3724). Note that performance will depend on how close you are to the 4G mast, and whether there are any walls or buildings in the way.

If you choose a router that can take two or more antennaeinternal26 or external LTE aerial27, you should be able to get a faster connection. Unfortunately, you may also have to learn about SMA, CRC9, TS9 and TS7 connectors.

Catch-up TV

Your suggested Panasonic DMR-EX97EB DVD/Freeview recorder looks like a good choice, though you might consider opting for Blu-ray instead of DVD. One advantage is that you can use the EPG (electronic programme guide) to record whole series rather than individual programmes. The disadvantage is that you can’t watch catch-up TV without an internet connection. If you have an unlimited connection, you can happily use services such as BBC iPlayer, and if your broadband isn’t fast enough to watch them live, you can download them to watch later.

According to Netflix28, a standard definition movies consume about 0.7GB per hour, high-definition movies about 3GB per hour, and Ultra HD movies 7GB per hour. You won’t want to do much of that if you are paying Three ?1.67 per gigabyte, let alone ?5 or ?10 per gigabyte. However, if your broadband consumption is light, you may find you have spare bandwidth that you can use up at the end of each month.

No landline?

Standard broadband services are usually delivered over a landline, which can cost roughly ?15 to ?20 per month. The wholesale price of these connections, supervised by Ofcom, pays BT’s Openreach division to operate and maintain the network. If you have an alternative connection, such as Virgin cable or 4G broadband, then you might save money by not having a landline.

However, bear in mind that BT has a standard reconnection charge of ?13029.

Also, the ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) changed the rules last October30, so now broadband prices include both broadband and line rental, and sometimes evening and weekend calls as well. As a result, you can get unlimited broadband and line rental for less than the cost of HomeFi, with prices starting at less than ?20 per month. This makes 4G services much less attractive.

Have you got a question?

Email it to [email protected]

References

  1. ^ Feel at home (www.three.co.uk)
  2. ^ HomeFi (www.three.co.uk)
  3. ^ DVD player/Freeview HD recorder (m.johnlewis.com)
  4. ^ UK Broadband Availability Checker (availability.samknows.com)
  5. ^ Wimax (en.wikipedia.org)
  6. ^ ISP Review (www.ispreview.co.uk)
  7. ^ Ofcom’s free broadband and mobile checker app (www.ofcom.org.uk)
  8. ^ Commsworld (www.commsworld.com)
  9. ^ launched in the UK in 2003 (news.bbc.co.uk)
  10. ^ the first 4G networks (www.theguardian.com)
  11. ^ Three’s HomeFi (www.three.co.uk)
  12. ^ buy an add-on (www.three.co.uk)
  13. ^ Traffic Flow (community.giffgaff.com)
  14. ^ Broadbandspeedchecker.co.uk (www.broadbandspeedchecker.co.uk)
  15. ^ uSwitch (www.uswitch.com)
  16. ^ Netflix (help.netflix.com)
  17. ^ already being tested in the UK (www.zdnet.com)
  18. ^ 5G FWA (www.arqiva.com)
  19. ^ 190MHz of spectrum for 5G (www.ofcom.org.uk)
  20. ^ TP-Link’s M7350 (uk.tp-link.com)
  21. ^ Scan (www.scan.co.uk)
  22. Huawei E5577C (?69.99) (www.amazon.co.uk)
  23. ^ Asus 4G-AC55U (www.asus.com)
  24. ?232.37 (www.amazon.co.uk)
  25. antennae (www.amazon.co.uk)
  26. internal (www.amazon.co.uk)
  27. ^ external LTE aerial (www.solwise.co.uk)
  28. ^ Netflix (help.netflix.com)
  29. ^ standard reconnection charge of ?130 (bt.custhelp.com)
  30. ^ the ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) changed the rules last October (www.asa.org.uk)

BT Scotland: Don’t Underestimate Scotland’s Broadband Infrastructure

Recent headlines suggesting Scotland’s ‘poor’ digital infrastructure could threaten the economy underestimate the country’s digital capabilities and miss the real issue. The new Queensferry Crossing is a magnificent achievement and is rightly praised – but the roll-out of fibre broadband across the whole of Scotland is an equally successful civil engineering project on a similar scale. It’s on time, on budget and, indeed, has delivered more coverage at higher speeds than originally planned to date, with work ongoing. So why do we constantly sell ourselves short to the world, and potential inward investors, by claiming our infrastructure isn’t up to the job? The facts are: Independent analysis1 by ThinkBroadband shows that more than 90% of Scottish households and business premises can now order broadband at speeds of 30Mbps and above.
To put this in context, the UK’s independent Broadband Stakeholder Group has previously suggested the average household will require a maximum of 19Mbps by 2023. So far, only around a third of premises have upgraded to the faster fibre-based speeds. Think Broadband estimates that if everyone in Scotland was to buy the fastest service now available to them over any network, the maximum mean download speed would rise to more than 150Mbps.
The Scottish economy would benefit most from greater exploitation of the internet capacities that are available right now. Thousands of small and medium sized businesses, with average bandwidth needs, have access to Openreach’s fibre-based network at speeds of up to 80Mbps. (A typical fibre-to-the-cabinet line is around 93% fibre and 7% copper, so to describe it as copper is a bit misleading.) Meanwhile any business or organisation with significant bandwidth demands can buy dedicated ultrafast services from BT and other services providers with a range of gigabit speeds available. We work with businesses to deliver what they need, where they need it most – not just in city centres.

But the story doesn’t end there. Openreach is now at the start of a new roll-out of next generation ultrafast broadband infrastructure, using both fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) and its new G.fast technology. The latter uses existing fibre and copper, but can provide speeds of up to 330Mbps -and because it builds on the existing network, it can be rolled out very quickly and efficiently, without the need to dig up the roads. Openreach is currently deploying FTTP in the very rural communities of Skerray and Altnaharra in a trial looking at how such delivery can be made more efficient. And it is working with developers to build FTTP connectivity for free into all new developments of 30 houses or more. The bottom line is that Scotland can have whatever technology it wants from Shetland to Stranraer, but there is a cost. Detractors, who do not have to contribute to these costs, have said little about how they imagine such services will be paid for. Scotland is not South Korea, Singapore or even the much-mooted Faroe Islands. The geographic challenges – and associated costs – of laying fibre across Scotland are immense. It’s extremely difficult – and expensive – to bury cable in granite. Most people don’t live in easily-wired apartment blocks – they live in individual homes and scattered settlements in some of the least populated parts of Europe.

The Shetland Islands alone cover a larger geographic area than the Faroes. Singapore’s population of 5m live in an area the size of East Lothian with a population density more than 100 times greater than Scotland’s. Singapore invested ?445m of public money to fund its fibre rollout – the pro-rata equivalent would be around ?10bn of public money in the UK.

At BT we’re always open to a respectful conversation about infrastructure. Unlike some of our detractors, we’re investing in the digital future for all of Scotland. But as a nation, we need to focus our efforts on making the most of the significant digital capabilities already in place right now, across all sectors of the economy.

Tell the world!

Like this:

Like Loading…

Related

References

  1. ^ Independent analysis (labs.thinkbroadband.com)

BT: Don’t Underestimate Scotland’s Digital Infrastructure

Recent headlines suggesting Scotland’s ‘poor’ digital infrastructure could threaten the economy underestimate the country’s digital capabilities and miss the real issue. The new Queensferry Crossing is a magnificent achievement and is rightly praised – but the roll-out of fibre broadband across the whole of Scotland is an equally successful civil engineering project on a similar scale. It’s on time, on budget and, indeed, has delivered more coverage at higher speeds than originally planned to date, with work ongoing. So why do we constantly sell ourselves short to the world, and potential inward investors, by claiming our infrastructure isn’t up to the job? The facts are: Independent analysis1 by ThinkBroadband shows that more than 90% of Scottish households and business premises can now order broadband at speeds of 30Mbps and above.
To put this in context, the UK’s independent Broadband Stakeholder Group has previously suggested the average household will require a maximum of 19Mbps by 2023. So far, only around a third of premises have upgraded to the faster fibre-based speeds. Think Broadband estimates that if everyone in Scotland was to buy the fastest service now available to them over any network, the maximum mean download speed would rise to more than 150Mbps.
The Scottish economy would benefit most from greater exploitation of the internet capacities that are available right now. Thousands of small and medium sized businesses, with average bandwidth needs, have access to Openreach’s fibre-based network at speeds of up to 80Mbps. (A typical fibre-to-the-cabinet line is around 93% fibre and 7% copper, so to describe it as copper is a bit misleading.) Meanwhile any business or organisation with significant bandwidth demands can buy dedicated ultrafast services from BT and other services providers with a range of gigabit speeds available. We work with businesses to deliver what they need, where they need it most – not just in city centres.

But the story doesn’t end there. Openreach is now at the start of a new roll-out of next generation ultrafast broadband infrastructure, using both fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) and its new G.fast technology. The latter uses existing fibre and copper, but can provide speeds of up to 330Mbps -and because it builds on the existing network, it can be rolled out very quickly and efficiently, without the need to dig up the roads. Openreach is currently deploying FTTP in the very rural communities of Skerray and Altnaharra in a trial looking at how such delivery can be made more efficient. And it is working with developers to build FTTP connectivity for free into all new developments of 30 houses or more. The bottom line is that Scotland can have whatever technology it wants from Shetland to Stranraer, but there is a cost. Detractors, who do not have to contribute to these costs, have said little about how they imagine such services will be paid for. Scotland is not South Korea, Singapore or even the much-mooted Faroe Islands. The geographic challenges – and associated costs – of laying fibre across Scotland are immense. It’s extremely difficult – and expensive – to bury cable in granite. Most people don’t live in easily-wired apartment blocks – they live in individual homes and scattered settlements in some of the least populated parts of Europe.

The Shetland Islands alone cover a larger geographic area than the Faroes. Singapore’s population of 5m live in an area the size of East Lothian with a population density more than 100 times greater than Scotland’s. Singapore invested ?445m of public money to fund its fibre rollout – the pro-rata equivalent would be around ?10bn of public money in the UK.

At BT we’re always open to a respectful conversation about infrastructure. Unlike some of our detractors, we’re investing in the digital future for all of Scotland. But as a nation, we need to focus our efforts on making the most of the significant digital capabilities already in place right now, across all sectors of the economy.

Tell the world!

Like this:

Like Loading…

Related

References

  1. ^ Independent analysis (labs.thinkbroadband.com)