Clackmannanshire

Reference Library – Scotland – Clackmannanshire Broadband

Pete's Place: America's Love Affair With Nuclear & Radioactive …

The United States would have the world believe that it is in mortal danger should nations like Iran or North Korea obtain operationally effective nuclear weapons. We are told that there is a grave risk of these weapons being used against another nation and that the US (with the support of the international community ) must confront these government, and if possible undermine and overthrow them. Why? Since a nation has already used nuclear weapons against another state, ironically enough that nation being the United States itself, we already know the devastating effects of nuclear weapons. Besides the immense, indiscriminate initial blast, nuclear weapons also produce a persistent radioactive threat amid the fallout afterwards. The fallout and the catastrophic effects it has on human health for years afterward make nuclear weapons particularly horrifying and abhorrent. The United States didn t drop only one nuclear bomb on another nation, Japan, it dropped two. The data collected in the aftermath of these attacks have helped form our collective fear of these weapons. Ironically the US is using the fear its own nuclear warfare has created as leverage to wage still more war. Depleted Uranium All the Fallout, None of the Bang
But what if the catastrophic human health effects of fallout could be achieved without the immense, city-flattening initial explosion?

What if you could use a weapon to induce long-term spikes in cancer and birth defects without the political ramifications of dropping a nuclear bomb on a population? Some readers may be tempted to cite dirty bombs, and they would be partially correct. But there is another correct answer. Depleted uranium or DU ammunition. Depleted uranium is one of the densest materials munitions can be made out of. Because of their density, they are able to penetrate armor other rounds cannot. DU was initially conceived as an additional deterrence, a weapon of last resort in the event of a full-scale Soviet invasion of Western Europe during the Cold War.
Because of the overwhelming number of tanks the Soviet Union possessed, it was believed extraordinary measures would be needed to even the odds, even at the cost of radioactive contamination of the battlefield.
The catastrophic effects of littering the battlefield with contaminated ammunition possessing a half-life of several billion years was a risk NATO was willing to take to ensure the survival of Western Europe. How then, did this weapon of last resort become a weapon commonly used?
This month marks the 25th anniversary of the start of Operation Desert Storm, the combat phase of the Gulf War. Precipitated by Iraq s invasion and annexation of Kuwait in August 1990, the conflict was the first to see the widespread use of depleted uranium (DU) ammunition.

US and UK forces subsequently acknowledged firing a combined 286,000kg of DU the vast majority of which was fired by US Abrams and M60 tanks, and A10 and Harrier aircraft. ICBUW would also note that the use of DU has impacted both soldiers who used the weapons as well as civilians trapped on or near battlefields they were used on.
Latinos Health1 included in one of their recent articles the following caption:

The Czech military is testing all of its soldiers that served in the Balkans for possible signs of Balkan Syndrome, an unexplained condition that is thought to be caused by depleted uranium used in NATO ammunition. Recent media reports claim that scientists have found evidence of Uranium 236 in blood samples from soldiers who served in the Gulf War, where depleted uranium ammunition was also used.

It should strike people as disturbing that the United States poses as the greatest advocate against weapons of mass destruction and a champion for preserving the lives and wellbeing of innocent people affected by war, all while using weapons of mass destruction, repeatedly, at the expense of innocent lives affected by their various wars.
DU has turned up in both Iraq wars, NATO s intervention in the Balkans and in Afghanistan. Courts around the world have ruled in favor on several cases regarding the effects of DU, including a British Gulf War veteran who became ill because of the radioactive weapons.
The BBC would report in their story, Gulf soldier wins pension fight2, that:
A former soldier is believed to be the first veteran to win a war pension appeal after suffering depleted uranium poisoning during the first Gulf War. A tribunal in Edinburgh found in favour of Kenny Duncan from Clackmannanshire who became ill after his service in the Middle East.
He had helped move tanks destroyed by shells containing depleted uranium. One can only wonder how many nameless, faceless and voiceless civilians living on or near former battlefields have also been affected like Mr. Duncan from Clackmannanshire, who will never receive the assistance needed to recover from what America s indiscriminate and unnecessary use of radiological weapons has done to them and their communities.
While it is hopeful seeing mounting awareness and subsequent pressure being applied to the United States and other governments around the world who might also consider using this weapon and others like it, we are still faced with the problem that the US, essentially the worst violator when it comes to nuclear and radiological weapons, poses as the primary advocate policing the world against them. Not only is the US guilty of immense hypocrisy, it has managed to hijack what are supposed to be international institutions to help perpetrate this hypocrisy.

This is yet another example of just how important it is to establish a true balance of global power through a multipolar system of sovereign nations, in place of the international order that currently exists, which sidesteps nation sovereignty and empowers global criminality rather than stopping it. Ulson Gunnar, a New York-based geopolitical analyst and writer especially for the online magazine New Eastern Outlook3 .

References

  1. ^ Latinos Health (www.latinoshealth.com)
  2. ^ Gulf soldier wins pension fight (news.bbc.co.uk)
  3. ^ New Eastern Outlook (journal-neo.org)

Broadband Connection Voucher Scheme Success

A number of small businesses across Clackmannanshire have received a grant to upgrade to faster, better broadband through the Broadband Connection Voucher Scheme.

The scheme, which ran from March to October 2015, provided grants of up to 3,000 to cover the capital and equipment costs of upgrading your broadband connection. The total number of vouchers issued in Clackmannanshire was 15 with a total value 9,482.

2,899 vouchers were issued across the whole of Scotland.

Broadband Connection Voucher Scheme SuccessEnterprise and Environment Convener Donald Balsillie said: For many businesses high speed broadband isn t a luxury, it s a necessity. It is frustrating that some small businesses can t get the broadband connection they need so I m delighted to hear that 15 local businesses have received help to change that with Broadband Connection Vouchers.

I am determined to ensure that the Council does all that it can to support the expansion of the fibre broadband network across Clackmannanshire and enable businesses to connect to it particularly in our commercial and industrial areas.

Government Close to Achieving 90 Percent UK Superfast …

Government Close To Achieving 90 Percent UK Superfast ...

The Government s Broadband Delivery UK project takes a lot of flak, but this often overlooks some of the good progress that has been made. New data now appears to confirm that the original 90% coverage target for superfast broadband (24Mbps+) availability is finally within touching distance. At this point we should highlight that, prior to BDUK, commercial investment had already helped operators like BT and Virgin Media to expand fixed line superfast connectivity to around 70% of the UK. However those ISPs were slow or unwilling to invest in connecting the final 30%, which are more expensive to tackle, and so the Government s BDUK programme was formed. The 90% target was originally set as part of BDUK s first funding phase ( 530m from the Government /BBC TV Licence fee) and this was initially targeted to be achieved during 2015, although they later tweaked that to by 2016 in order to allow some breathing room after administrative delays.

All of the contracts for BDUK Phase One are being delivered by BT, which has predominantly used its up to 80Mbps capable Fibre-to-the-Cabinet (FTTC) service and a little FTTP. A second target also exists for pushing this coverage to 95% by the end of 2017/18 (adds another 1 million+ premises with some input from altnet ISPs), but we ll focus on that after 90% is achieved. The most recent data from BDUK, which was published at the very end of 2015 (here), reported that 3.5 million additional premises have so far benefited from the programme; the 90% coverage target is expected to be achieved at around the 4 million+ mark (a Spring 2016 completion is expected).

Naturally we wanted to offer a bit more data to show the current level of superfast (24Mbps+) and fibre based (includes lines that also deliver sub-24Mbps speeds) coverage by each local authority / district area. Luckily we can always rely upon Thinkbroadband to help us fill in the gaps and they ve kindly furnished us with the full data. Overall some 88.7% of the UK can now order a superfast broadband connection (92.5% for raw fibre based coverage), although obviously this estimate doesn t account for any problems (slow speeds) caused by local network capacity or poor home wiring etc. Likewise the figures below only include the impact from BT, Virgin Media and KC s deployments (altnets only have a tiny impact at national scale and aren t yet factored). NOTE: The following list of local authorities looks at more than county-level coverage.

For example, Poole and Bournemouth are both part of Dorset in England, although they also have their own separate entries below. Likewise we also include districts.

Wales (85.1% superfast )

Authority Name % Fibre Based Coverage % Over 24Mbps ( Superfast ) Abertawe Swansea 95.5 92.9 Blaenau Gwent Blaenau Gwent 99.1 96.5 Bro Morgannwg the Vale of Glamorgan 93.6 90.1 Caerdydd Cardiff 97.3 95.4 Caerffili Caerphilly 97.1 94.2 Casnewydd Newport 96.2 93.8 Castell-nedd Port Talbot Neath Port Talbot 93.2 89.8 Conwy Conwy 88.2 80.2 Gwynedd Gwynedd 83.8 72.8 Merthyr Tudful Merthyr Tydfil 99.1 94.2 Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr Bridgend 96 93.1 Powys Powys 63 52.7 Rhondda Cynon Taf Rhondda Cynon Taf 97.9 94.3 Sir Benfro Pembrokeshire 75.4 68.1 Sir Ceredigion Ceredigion 62.1 51.7 Sir Ddinbych Denbighshire 82.6 77.3 Sir Fynwy Monmouthshire 80.3 71.5 Sir Gaerfyrddin Carmarthenshire 71.4 65.7 Sir y Fflint Flintshire 92.3 86.8 Sir Ynys Mon Isle of Anglesey 81.4 72.5 Tor-faen Torfaen 96.1 94.6 Wrecsam Wrexham 91.7 85.8

Scotland (82.1% superfast )

Authority Name % Fibre Based Coverage % Over 24Mbps ( Superfast ) Aberdeen City 93.2 91.2 Aberdeenshire 78.3 67 Angus 78.7 72.6 Argyll and Bute 50.2 43.7 City of Edinburgh 93.7 93.5 Clackmannanshire 85.6 84.4 Dumfries and Galloway 81.8 69.5 Dundee City 98.1 97.8 East Ayrshire 86.5 80.4 East Dunbartonshire 91.6 89.9 East Lothian 77.4 72.6 East Renfrewshire 90.8 89.4 Falkirk 90.4 89.4 Fife 87.5 85 Glasgow City 92 90.9 Highland 73.7 61.6 Inverclyde 90.3 88.6 Midlothian 76.6 71.3 Moray 82.4 73.8 Na h-Eileanan an Iar 39.7 26.1 North Ayrshire 81.4 77.5 North Lanarkshire 93.7 91.6 Orkney Islands 44 37.9 Perth and Kinross 70.2 62.9 Renfrewshire 91.8 90.3 Scottish Borders 72.8 61.9 Shetland Islands 48.4 38.9 South Ayrshire 85.1 81.4 South Lanarkshire 91.6 87.3 Stirling 80.3 74.7 West Dunbartonshire 95.8 95.2 West Lothian 84.5 82

Northern Ireland (77.7% superfast )

Authority Name % Fibre Based Coverage % Over 24Mbps ( Superfast ) Belfast East 97.2 96.2 Belfast North 97.2 96.3 Belfast South 95.9 95 Belfast West 98.5 96.5 East Antrim 90.2 80.3 East Londonderry 95.5 74.8 Fermanagh and South Tyrone 94.6 56.4 Foyle 97.2 91.9 Lagan Valley 96.8 76.9 Mid Ulster 94.1 56.7 Newry and Armagh 95.5 63.7 North Antrim 89.3 61.6 North Down 96.2 90.8 South Antrim 93.9 73.5 South Down 91.6 59.7 Strangford 93.8 73.3 Upper Bann 94.3 80.5 West Tyrone 95 58.3

England (89.8% superfast )

Authority Name % Fibre Based Coverage % Over 24Mbps ( Superfast ) Adur District 99.2 98.7 Allerdale District 87.1 80.9 Amber Valley District 94.8 88.3 Arun District 98.7 93.5 Ashfield District 98.9 97.5 Ashford District 87.8 78.7 Aylesbury Vale District 86.8 80.2 Babergh District 89.2 77.7 Barking and Dagenham 98.9 98.9 Barnet 95.5 94.2 Barnsley District 84.9 82.4 Barrow-in-Furness District 98.4 96.1 Basildon District 97.4 95.5 Basingstoke and Deane District 91.9 86.6 Bassetlaw District 92.9 87.9 Bath and North East Somerset 85.9 82.2 Bedford 90.1 87.8 Bexley 94.8 94.5 Birmingham District 95.5 95.2 Blaby District 96.7 94.8 Blackburn with Darwen 96.2 95.2 Blackpool 98.6 98.2 Bolsover District 96.4 92.7 Bolton District 97.9 97.5 Boston District 92.7 82.4 Bournemouth 99.2 98.9 Bracknell Forest 98.3 95.1 Bradford District 96.4 94.7 Braintree District 71.3 61.9 Breckland District 87.2 79.1 Brent 96.8 95.6 Brentwood District 88.9 86.3 Broadland District 90.7 85.5 Bromley 96.1 95.3 Bromsgrove District 92.1 85.5 Broxbourne District 99.6 99.1 Broxtowe District 97.8 97.5 Buckinghamshire County 92 86.7 Burnley District 99 97.4 Bury District 99 98 Calderdale District 90.6 86.4 Cambridge District 97.6 97.4 Cambridgeshire County 96.9 91.8 Camden 97.7 97.6 Cannock Chase District 97.9 90.9 Canterbury District 95.5 90.3 Carlisle District 91.2 87.8 Castle Point District 99 97.4 Central Bedfordshire 89.7 86.3 Charnwood District 96.1 94.2 Chelmsford District 90.1 86.5 Cheltenham District 96.9 96.4 Cherwell District 91.4 87.8 Cheshire East 95.2 90.1 Cheshire West and Chester 95.5 90.3 Chesterfield District 97 96.1 Chichester District 95.8 81.8 Chiltern District 93.4 90.6 Chorley District 97.5 94.8 Christchurch District 97.9 96.9 City and County of the City of London 19.1 15.4 City of Bristol 97.4 97.3 City of Derby 98 97.3 City of Kingston upon Hull 36.5 36.4 City of Leicester 95 95 City of Nottingham 97.7 97.2 City of Peterborough 98.6 96.6 City of Plymouth 98.3 97.3 City of Portsmouth 98.8 98.6 City of Southampton 96.2 96 City of Stoke-on-Trent 98.2 97.2 City of Westminster 73.8 71.8 City of Wolverhampton District 97.5 97.2 Colchester District 85.6 82.3 Copeland District 88.4 84.4 Corby District 96.3 95.8 Cornwall 96.1 86.1 Cotswold District 77.1 61.7 County Durham 95.8 90.3 County of Herefordshire 67.7 58.4 Coventry District 94.6 92.5 Craven District 91.5 81.8 Crawley District 99.5 98.6 Croydon 97.8 97.1 Cumbria County 88.8 82.7 Dacorum District 93.4 91.1 Darlington 94 92.4 Dartford District 96.9 93.6 Daventry District 84 76.3 Derbyshire County 92.7 87.4 Derbyshire Dales District 70.4 59.8 Devon County 81 71.7 Doncaster District 86.3 83.6 Dorset County 91.6 83.5 Dover District 96.2 88.3 Dudley District 96.1 96 Ealing 97.1 96.4 East Cambridgeshire District 98.5 86.6 East Devon District 81 70.6 East Dorset District 95.6 87 East Hampshire District 89.5 81.8 East Hertfordshire District 78.3 76.3 East Lindsey District 89 75.6 East Northamptonshire District 91.2 88.1 East Riding of Yorkshire 68.2 62 East Staffordshire District 92.7 85.7 East Sussex County 96.7 87.7 Eastbourne District 99.4 95.5 Eastleigh District 96.4 95.4 Eden District 76.7 64.6 Elmbridge District 99.6 99.2 Enfield 98.8 98.6 Epping Forest District 87.7 84.1 Epsom and Ewell District 98.6 98.1 Erewash District 97.5 95.8 Essex County 86.4 82.7 Exeter District 95.7 94.1 Fareham District 96.2 95.2 Fenland District 95.3 88.8 Forest Heath District 96 88.6 Forest of Dean District 73.5 65.9 Fylde District 93 90.3 Gateshead District 91.4 90.4 Gedling District 99.2 97.8 Gloucester District 96.9 95.4 Gloucestershire County 84.5 79.5 Gosport District 98.5 97.7 Gravesham District 96.7 95.5 Great Yarmouth District 96.4 92.9 Greenwich 95.8 94.9 Guildford District 98.2 94.8 Hackney 97.7 97.3 Halton 96.9 96.4 Hambleton District 93 76.2 Hammersmith and Fulham 94.2 90.7 Hampshire County 92.9 88.8 Harborough District 93.9 85.8 Haringey 98.2 98.2 Harlow District 98.5 98 Harrogate District 95.9 85.8 Harrow 98.1 98.1 Hart District 94.7 90.3 Hartlepool 96.4 94.6 Hastings District 96.6 93.9 Havant District 99.2 98.7 Havering 98.3 97.8 Hertfordshire County 93.4 91.8 Hertsmere District 97.9 96 High Peak District 87.6 81 Hillingdon 96.3 95.7 Hinckley and Bosworth District 94.8 92 Horsham District 97.7 84.7 Hounslow 98.6 98.1 Huntingdonshire District 97.6 93.3 Hyndburn District 99.4 97.7 Ipswich District 98.5 98.4 Isle of Wight 98 94 Isles of Scilly 99.5 92.7 Islington 96.7 95.8 Kensington and Chelsea 95.8 95.5 Kent County 94 88 Kettering District 94.7 93 King s Lynn and West Norfolk District 90.2 80.4 Kingston upon Thames 99.4 98.9 Kirklees District 86.9 85.1 Knowsley District 97.6 97.3 Lambeth 96.5 94.4 Lancashire County 94.9 92 Lancaster District 93 89 Leeds District 96.5 94.3 Leicestershire County 94.7 91.2 Lewes District 97 90.4 Lewisham 96.2 94.3 Lichfield District 94.4 88.8 Lincoln District 99.2 99 Lincolnshire County 94.3 84.4 Liverpool District 95.5 95.2 Luton 99 98.4 Maidstone District 93.2 86.8 Maldon District 74.4 67.4 Malvern Hills District 77.2 68.1 Manchester District 93 92.3 Mansfield District 99.2 99 Medway 98.2 96.7 Melton District 82.3 77.2 Mendip District 76.7 71 Merton 98.8 98.6 Mid Devon District 68.1 57.1 Mid Suffolk District 81.4 65.8 Mid Sussex District 98.5 90.6 Middlesbrough 96 95.7 Milton Keynes 96 94.3 Mole Valley District 98.2 92.2 New Forest District 92.4 84.9 Newark and Sherwood District 93.4 88.7 Newcastle upon Tyne District 95.8 95.3 Newcastle-under-Lyme District 90.5 86.9 Newham 94.2 93.3 Norfolk County 90 83.8 North Devon District 80.9 73.7 North Dorset District 85.3 69.7 North East Derbyshire District 95.7 88.7 North East Lincolnshire 95.4 94.4 North Hertfordshire District 86.7 84.9 North Kesteven District 95.4 84.1 North Lincolnshire 92.9 87.3 North Norfolk District 81.4 73.3 North Somerset 87.4 82.1 North Tyneside District 88.9 88 North Warwickshire District 89.7 83.8 North West Leicestershire District 95.6 90.8 North Yorkshire County 94.6 82.5 Northampton District 96.6 96.5 Northamptonshire County 92 90 Northumberland 93.6 85.2 Norwich District 98.6 98.6 Nottinghamshire County 96.7 94.4 Nuneaton and Bedworth District 99.3 97.4 Oadby and Wigston District 98.4 98 Oldham District 98.5 97.8 Oxford District 97.9 96.7 Oxfordshire County 94 90 Pendle District 97.2 94.1 Poole 98.8 98.1 Preston District 94.8 94 Purbeck District 89.9 82.5 Reading 98.4 97.8 Redbridge 98 97.8 Redcar and Cleveland 92.5 91.6 Redditch District 97.9 96.8 Reigate and Banstead District 98.7 96.3 Ribble Valley District 92.9 82.8 Richmond upon Thames 97.4 97.3 Richmondshire District 93.2 75.1 Rochdale District 98.3 97.5 Rochford District 92.2 88.5 Rossendale District 99.2 96.3 Rother District 97.2 80.3 Rotherham District 83.1 79.9 Rugby District 91.2 85.9 Runnymede District 98 96.7 Rushcliffe District 95.5 92.1 Rushmoor District 98.2 97.2 Rutland 98.5 85.1 Salford District 96.3 95.9 Sandwell District 92.1 91.8 Scarborough District 97.4 91.2 Sedgemoor District 87.1 79.5 Sefton District 98.4 97.9 Selby District 96.8 83.9 Sevenoaks District 92.4 85.2 Sheffield District 87.5 85.5 Shepway District 87.1 79.5 Shropshire 81 68.7 Slough 97.9 97 Solihull District 96.3 93.1 Somerset County 85.9 77.9 South Bucks District 91.8 86.6 South Cambridgeshire District 95.7 90.5 South Derbyshire District 94.6 87.3 South Gloucestershire 98.2 92.6 South Hams District 71.7 60.8 South Holland District 94.5 81.4 South Kesteven District 94.7 88.2 South Lakeland District 87.4 77.8 South Norfolk District 84.2 75.8 South Northamptonshire District 81.9 78.8 South Oxfordshire District 90.3 85.3 South Ribble District 98.4 97.2 South Somerset District 89 79.2 South Staffordshire District 91.1 81 South Tyneside District 93.4 93.2 Southend-on-Sea 97.1 96.7 Southwark 90 86.6 Spelthorne District 98.4 97.9 St. Albans District 96.4 95.1 St. Edmundsbury District 91.2 84.3 St. Helens District 90 89.4 Stafford District 89.9 83.5 Staffordshire County 92.9 86.7 Staffordshire Moorlands District 84.4 75.1 Stevenage District 99.2 99 Stockport District 98.5 98 Stockton-on-Tees 94.4 93.5 Stratford-on-Avon District 80.2 68.3 Stroud District 64.4 58.6 Suffolk Coastal District 90.6 80.6 Suffolk County 91.9 84.5 Sunderland District 96.6 95.2 Surrey County 98.3 95.5 Surrey Heath District 98.5 97.1 Sutton 99.2 98.8 Swale District 93.4 86.7 Swindon 84.4 83.1 Tameside District 98.3 97.5 Tamworth District 99.6 99.3 Tandridge District 98.2 90.7 Taunton Deane District 89.5 82.5 Teignbridge District 86.1 76.7 Telford and Wrekin 90.5 88.3 Tendring District 83.8 80.5 Test Valley District 85.5 79.4 Tewkesbury District 85.7 81.2 Thanet District 98.8 96.6 The City of Brighton and Hove 99.3 99.1 Three Rivers District 97.7 94.5 Thurrock 94.7 92.1 Tonbridge and Malling District 95.1 87 Torbay 94 93 Torridge District 81.9 67.7 Tower Hamlets 81.1 74 Trafford District 98.4 97.6 Tunbridge Wells District 93.3 86.2 Uttlesford District 60.5 56.4 Vale of White Horse District 95.6 90 Wakefield District 97.2 93.1 Walsall District 95.1 94 Waltham Forest 98.9 98.9 Wandsworth 95.7 93.3 Warrington 96.7 95.2 Warwick District 96.4 93.3 Warwickshire County 91.7 86.4 Watford District 97 97 Waveney District 94.6 90.9 Wealden District 94.1 80.7 Wellingborough District 92.4 91.6 Welwyn Hatfield District 96 94.4 West Berkshire 87.8 81.9 West Devon District 68.7 51.9 West Dorset District 86.5 76.1 West Lancashire District 85.4 81.1 West Lindsey District 96.5 81.5 West Oxfordshire District 93.4 86.3 West Somerset District 77.8 68.3 West Sussex County 98.3 91.8 Weymouth and Portland District 97.3 95.1 Wigan District 98 97.4 Wiltshire 92.2 81.6 Winchester District 82.3 76.7 Windsor and Maidenhead 93.7 89.4 Wirral District 96.3 95.2 Woking District 98.7 98.1 Wokingham 95.5 92.1 Worcester District 98.5 97 Worcestershire County 91.1 85.5 Worthing District 99.6 99.4 Wychavon District 85.2 74.3 Wycombe District 95.9 90.8 Wyre District 92.4 89.8 Wyre Forest District 92.9 88.8 York 92.9 90

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Government Close To Achieving 90 Percent UK Superfast ...

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