Manchester

Reference Library – England – Manchester Broadband

Superfast broadband: Thousands more homes and businesses to benefit

A ?28million deal to continue the roll out of superfast broadband means 98 per cent of people in Coventry,1 Warwickshire and Solihull will have access to it. The CSW Broadband partnership will take ultrafast broadband to thousands more homes and businesses in some of the region’s most remote locations.

The investment is being made possible thanks to different funding sources, including local authorities, the Government, BT and the Coventry and Warwickshire Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP). CSW Broadband is responsible for the roll-out with BT as its co-funding network partner.

Superfast Broadband: Thousands More Homes And Businesses To Benefit

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More details about the first locations to benefit will be announced early next month. The latest roll-out is part of an ongoing CSW Broadband programme and will be delivered by Openreach.

It will use a mixture of technologies, including fibre to the premises (FTTP) technology, capable of delivering download speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second (Gbps) and upload speeds of up to 220Mbps. The new investment will enable nearly 15,500 more premises in Coventry, Solihull and Warwickshire to access superfast fibre broadband, with the majority of them – almost 90 per cent – able to get ultrafast speeds. The CSW Broadband programme is spearheaded by Warwickshire County Council and BT, and part of the Government’s Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK) programme.

The latest phase of the roll-out includes around ?2million from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), with additional funding from Coventry City Council, Solihull Council, Warwickshire County Council, Warwickshire District and Borough Councils, as well as BT. Engineers from Openreach will begin work on this phase next spring. The roll-out is expected to reach the first premises in around 12 months’ time, with all the upgrades due to be completed by the end of 2019. It builds on the first two phases of the CSW Broadband programme.

Cllr Peter Butlin, deputy leader of Warwickshire County Council,2 said: “This announcement is great news.

When the CSW Broadband project started, just over 73 per cent of premises in Warwickshire could achieve speeds of 24Mbps or above.

“We’re looking forward to more than 98 per cent being able to achieve what would at one time have been unthinkable speeds of over 30Mbps.”

“Steve Haines, managing director of next generation access for Openreach, said: “This major investment is a vital new chapter in the story which began nearly three-and-a-half years ago, when the partnership began connecting its first premises in Snitterfield.

“CSW Broadband is already a huge success and now we’re set to go even further as it reaches into some of the region’s most remote areas.

“The roll-out of high-speed broadband across Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull has transformed the way people get online which is why we’re committed to making this exciting technology as widely available as possible.”

Because the fibre broadband network is being installed by Openreach, households and businesses have a choice of fibre broadband providers.

Upgrades do not happen automatically and people who want to benefit need to place an order with their chosen fibre broadband provider.

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References

  1. ^ Coventry, (www.coventrytelegraph.net)
  2. ^ Warwickshire County Council, (www.coventrytelegraph.net)
  3. ^ here for iPhone (itunes.apple.com)
  4. ^ here for Android (play.google.com)
  5. ^ archives (www.coventrytelegraph.net)

The best and worst broadband providers have been rated by customer satisfaction

Telecoms giant TalkTalk has been named the worst broadband provider in Britain by consumer watchdog Which? It found the firm was not on the same wavelength as account holders, scoring just 40 out of 100 in a customer satisfaction survey. The biggest gripes about TalkTalk were slow broadband speeds, screens freezing and poor customer service.

It is the fifth time running the provider has been last in the consumer champion’s satisfaction league. And there was a fall from grace from Sky which was the second worst according to a poll of 1,700 telecoms customers.

Broadband companies are not up to speed according to Which?

It managed just 45 out of 100, tumbling from eighth in a Which? survey in April, to 11th. BT rose one place from 11th to 10th with 46 and the Post Office was ranked one place higher with 47.

Minnow Zen Internet was rated tops with 85 followed by Utility Warehouse with 76 as both were seen as offering value for money by customers. SSE took third place with 68 and John Lewis Broadband came fourth with 66.

The best and worst broadband providers

Source: Which? Which? has launched a Fix Bad Broadband campaign1 and is calling on households to check their speeds via an online tool which shows the actual speed which can then be compared with the advertised one.

Alex Neill, Which? managing director of home products and services, said: “Far too many people are still getting a poor deal from their broadband provider. Big players need to improve their service across the board or expect their customers to take their business elsewhere.”

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Yesterday (Thurs), TalkTalk admitted it was “disappointed” by the survey results but was working hard to get the service up to speed. A spokesperson said: “We strive to give customers the best possible experience. Our extensive investment programme has already led to fewer faults and quicker repair times.

“Whilst we’re very pleased to see this paying off with rising customer satisfaction on TV bundles, we are disappointed by the survey results on broadband.

We will continue investing to improve the service we deliver.”

Your broadband consumer rights

It you think your service is bad, the good news is you could be entitled to compensation. That’s because your broadband provider has a legal obligation to deliver what you pay for – and what you were sold. These are your rights:

  • All goods and services must be of satisfactory quality, fit for purpose, delivered as described, and provided to a proper standard of workmanship. In other words, your broadband should work.

  • Both you and your broadband provider must comply with the terms on your contract. If you consider your provider to be in breach of the contract – e.g.

    if you’re not being delivered consistent service – you have the right to cancel it.

  • The contract with your broadband provider must be fair.

  • You have the right to cancel your contract at any point – though in some circumstances you’ll need to pay a fee.

References

  1. ^ Fix Bad Broadband campaign (broadbandtest.which.co.uk)

The best and worst broadband providers

Telecoms giant TalkTalk has been named the worst broadband provider in Britain by consumer watchdog Which? It found the firm was not on the same wavelength as account holders, scoring just 40 out of 100 in a customer satisfaction survey. The biggest gripes about TalkTalk were slow broadband speeds, screens freezing and poor customer service.

It is the fifth time running the provider has been last in the consumer champion’s satisfaction league. And there was a fall from grace from Sky which was the second worst according to a poll of 1,700 telecoms customers.

Broadband companies are not up to speed according to Which?

It managed just 45 out of 100, tumbling from eighth in a Which? survey in April, to 11th. BT rose one place from 11th to 10th with 46 and the Post Office was ranked one place higher with 47.

Minnow Zen Internet was rated tops with 85 followed by Utility Warehouse with 76 as both were seen as offering value for money by customers. SSE took third place with 68 and John Lewis Broadband came fourth with 66.

The best and worst broadband providers

Source: Which? Which? has launched a Fix Bad Broadband campaign1 and is calling on households to check their speeds via an online tool which shows the actual speed which can then be compared with the advertised one.

Alex Neill, Which? managing director of home products and services, said: “Far too many people are still getting a poor deal from their broadband provider. Big players need to improve their service across the board or expect their customers to take their business elsewhere.”

Read More

Yesterday (Thurs), TalkTalk admitted it was “disappointed” by the survey results but was working hard to get the service up to speed. A spokesperson said: “We strive to give customers the best possible experience. Our extensive investment programme has already led to fewer faults and quicker repair times.

“Whilst we’re very pleased to see this paying off with rising customer satisfaction on TV bundles, we are disappointed by the survey results on broadband.

We will continue investing to improve the service we deliver.”

Your broadband consumer rights

It you think your service is bad, the good news is you could be entitled to compensation. That’s because your broadband provider has a legal obligation to deliver what you pay for – and what you were sold. These are your rights:

  • All goods and services must be of satisfactory quality, fit for purpose, delivered as described, and provided to a proper standard of workmanship. In other words, your broadband should work.

  • Both you and your broadband provider must comply with the terms on your contract. If you consider your provider to be in breach of the contract – e.g.

    if you’re not being delivered consistent service – you have the right to cancel it.

  • The contract with your broadband provider must be fair.

  • You have the right to cancel your contract at any point – though in some circumstances you’ll need to pay a fee.

References

  1. ^ Fix Bad Broadband campaign (broadbandtest.which.co.uk)