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Chrome 64 Beta now lets you mute autoplay videos

Google has added the ability mute sound from autoplay videos in its Chrome 64 Beta browser, Engadget[1] reports. Google previously stated[2] its Chrome 64 browser would launch in January and would include a feature that mutes audio from autoplay videos. However, users can take advantage of this feature now by downloading the Chrome 64 beta browser[3].

The autoplay-muting option is found in the browser’s permissions bar and must be toggled manually for different websites.

Other upgrades included in the Chrome 64 Beta include a stronger pop-up blocker and support for HDR video.

Now read: Google South Africa – Top searches in 2017[4]

References

  1. ^ Engadget (www.engadget.com)
  2. ^ previously stated (mybroadband.co.za)
  3. ^ downloading the Chrome 64 beta browser (www.google.com)
  4. ^ Google South Africa – Top searches in 2017 (mybroadband.co.za)

Chrome 64 Beta now lets you mute autoplay videos

Google has added the ability mute sound from autoplay videos in its Chrome 64 Beta browser, Engadget[1] reports. Google previously stated[2] its Chrome 64 browser would launch in January and would include a feature that mutes audio from autoplay videos. However, users can take advantage of this feature now by downloading the Chrome 64 beta browser[3].

The autoplay-muting option is found in the browser’s permissions bar and must be toggled manually for different websites.

Other upgrades included in the Chrome 64 Beta include a stronger pop-up blocker and support for HDR video.

Now read: Google South Africa – Top searches in 2017[4]

References

  1. ^ Engadget (www.engadget.com)
  2. ^ previously stated (mybroadband.co.za)
  3. ^ downloading the Chrome 64 beta browser (www.google.com)
  4. ^ Google South Africa – Top searches in 2017 (mybroadband.co.za)

US votes to scrap net neutrality

The FCC in the US has voted to repeal regulations to protect the neutrality of broadband services in the country, the New York Times reported[1]. FCC chairman Ajit Pai defended the repeal before the vote, arguing that rescinding the rules would benefit consumers. Pai said broadband providers like AT&T and Comcast could offer consumers a wider variety of service options.

The regulations prohibited broadband providers from blocking websites or charging for higher-quality services or specific types of content.

They also allowed the federal government to regulate broadband as if it were a utility.

Now read: Bots flooded net neutrality comments[2]

References

  1. ^ the New York Times reported (www.nytimes.com)
  2. ^ Bots flooded net neutrality comments (mybroadband.co.za)